Community Papers

Tie-dyed teaching at NorKam

From left: Sukhi Paddha, Nikita McCollouch, Jasmit Mahal and Julia Guy, Alex Cooper (third from right), Breann Frazier and Rebecca Mathieson head back to class after lunch.   - DAVE EAGLES/KTW
From left: Sukhi Paddha, Nikita McCollouch, Jasmit Mahal and Julia Guy, Alex Cooper (third from right), Breann Frazier and Rebecca Mathieson head back to class after lunch. 
— image credit: DAVE EAGLES/KTW

It’s all about peace, love and understanding.

That’s the message being sent by more than 300 NorKam secondary students who donned colourful tie-dyed T-shirts during Anti-Bullying Day on Wednesday, Feb. 27.

This year, 40 Leadership Class students came up with an idea to support Pink Shirt Day by teaming up to create tie-dye T-shirts and pre-selling them to students.

They wanted to encourage the student body to think beyond bullying and to raise awareness of biases against sexual orientation and gender equality.

The talents of T-shirt artist Nyk Burlock were sought out to teach a group of leadership students how to make the shirts.

With more than 300 shirts pre-sold to students, the hallways came to life with a variety of hues among the 200-plus pink shirts mixing with the spirals and swirling coloured designs.

“The shirts are all unique.” leadership student Krysten Paluck said.

“It really adds to the message of equality, involvement and of being different.”

The popular shirts have helped more students get involved in taking a stand, as Burlock pointed out.

“Before, one or two would’ve had a pink shirt on in my classes. Now, there’s five or six. More kids are definitely getting involved.”

Leadership teacher Cheyenne Kennedy is proud of her students for their eagerness in getting involved and for finding new ways to help others care.

“It’s a great turnout this year,” she said. “It’s showing our diversity.”

Anti-Bullying Day (Pink Shirt Day) is a day celebrated during the last Wednesday of the month of February where participants wear pink to symbolize a stand against bullying. The idea originated in 2007 as a protest against a bullying incident at a Nova Scotia high school.

 

 

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