Business

Young: Leadership requires ability to seize opportunities

This topic has been an itch I’ve wanted to address in my column for some time now, so I thought I would tackle it this week.

Leaders deal in ideas—and also in ideals.

Successful entrepreneurs create a compelling vision of where their venture ought to lead.

They continuously communicate how to progress, guide and encourage the development of their venture’s capabilities, to advance their vision in a relentless and resolute pursuit of desired success.

The art of mastering truly encompasses unshakable will, determination and relentless pursuit of desires and goals which are key hallmarks of great entrepreneurial endeavour.

All great entrepreneurial leaders are marked with an exceptional sense of self-confidence, which is manifest on the surface and stimulates and encourages others.

Entrepreneurial success, like any success, is more about the understanding and mastery of key principles and less about predetermined rules.

The anxious, cautious and less experienced, as I once was, may tend to follow rules while the seemingly rebellious may unwittingly break rules with a sincere commitment of a call to action for the “greater good.”

But the master of an art, which I have a firm belief that entrepreneurship may be labelled such, develops a mastery over the form of the art using time tested and time proven principles.

The master understands the wisdom of the principles he or she so faithfully and assiduously practices.

Mastery of this art then should become the ideal of every entrepreneur who steps into ring.

Some of the ablest entrepreneurial leaders I have found known to history have been those who have arisen in times of crisis and danger.

Such leaders seem to have boundless courage and conviction, matched by self-confidence, sound judgment and a sense of discernment.

To them, impulse to power seems righteous and noble. It also seems such leaders care little for the trappings and rewards of power.

Thus, it is a combination of great faith, stirred by hope and supported by powerful abilities and strength of character, which enables leaders to inspire their followers and moves them to collectively “ seize the day” and capitalize on opportunities as they present themselves.

So, we may make many errors as we try to fall forward, as entrepreneur advocate author John Maxwell writes, in our quest for mastery of the art of entrepreneurship.

And, we must seek to learn as much as we can from every situation and encounter we have along the way.

Yet, we must not let our feelings nor shortcomings cause us to become discouraged, cynical nor intimidated such that we become too discouraged to try.

The adage which drilled into me in elementary school come examination time never left me— if at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.

That is wonderful advice for all of us. Nothing worthwhile is ever easily achieved.

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