Business

Anderson venturing into new role

Jim Anderson has been involved in the community while with Interior Savings Centre. In this 2010 photo, Anderson awards Kamloops Blazer Bronson Maschmeyer with the Eldon Dever Trophy for best defenceman.  - KTW FILE PHOTO
Jim Anderson has been involved in the community while with Interior Savings Centre. In this 2010 photo, Anderson awards Kamloops Blazer Bronson Maschmeyer with the Eldon Dever Trophy for best defenceman. 
— image credit: KTW FILE PHOTO

A transfer brought him here, but Jim Anderson is making sure one won’t take him out of Kamloops.

Anderson, a former branch manager with Interior Savings Credit Union, will become Venture Kamloops’ new executive director on Jan. 2.

He will replace Dan Sulz, who left the organization this fall after three years at the helm of Kamloops’ business-venture arm.

Anderson said one draw of the job for him was that it will keep his family in the Tournament Capital on a permanent basis — something not guaranteed in the financial world.

“We were transferred here through work and we were transferred away again and we moved back because we wanted to be here,” he said.

“When the opportunity came up to switch from financial services, where there’s always a chance you’re going to have to move, to something that’s based in Kamloops and for Kamloops, that was the reason for the change.”

Venture Kamloops is the city’s economic-development organization and is funded primarily by taxpayers.

Last year, it recieved $546,255 from the city.

Anderson believes the organization has a “strong history” of business attraction and retention, which he hopes to continue.

“We’re doing well,” he said.

“It’s a tough market out there. Every city of this size and bigger has economic-development departments that are all doing good jobs as well, but we’re definitely holding our own.”

He said Kamloops has a few advantages in the economic-development race.

“The quality of life that we offer in Kamloops is a big factor in the decisions that people make.

“It’s a smaller town, but we still have the big-city amenities,” he said.

“We’re not too far from anywhere.

“As far as business goes, transport to markets is an advantage.

“We have a lot of really good things going for us.”

 

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